In the previous post on Android user data security, we looked at encrypting data via a user-supplied passcode. This tutorial will shift the focus to credential and key storage. I’ll begin by introducing account credentials and end with an example of protecting data using the KeyStore.

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Application widgets provide your users with easy access to your application’s most frequently used features, while giving your app a presence on the user’s homescreen. By adding a widget to your project, you can provide a better user experience, while encouraging users to remain engaged with your application, as every single time they glance at their homescreen they’ll see your widget, displaying some of your app’s most useful and interesting content.

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Application widgets provide your users with easy access to your application’s most frequently used features, while giving your app a presence on the user’s homescreen. By adding a widget to your project, you can provide a better user experience, while encouraging users to remain engaged with your application, as every single time they glance at their homescreen they’ll see your widget, displaying some of your app’s most useful and interesting content.

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An app’s credibility today highly depends on how the user’s private data is managed. The Android stack has many powerful APIs surrounding credential and key storage, with specific features only available in certain versions. This short series will start off with a simple approach to get up and running by looking at the storage system and how to encrypt and store sensitive data via a user-supplied passcode. In the second tutorial, we will look at more complex ways of protecting keys and credentials.

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The Java Virtual Machine, or JVM for short, supports multithreading. Any process you run on it is free to create a reasonable number of threads to perform multiple tasks asynchronously. However, writing code that can do so in an optimal and error-free manner can be extremely hard. Over the years, Java, other JVM languages, and a lot of third-party libraries have tried to come up with creative and elegant approaches to address this problem.

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